McCormick’s

The building is known as the “Palace of Sweets” or the “Sunshine Palace” to many local residents, but to most explorers, its known as the “Candy Factory”. The building was designed by architects Watt & Blackwell to be “one of the finest and most sanitary factories in North America”. The building itself has some unusual features; nearly 70% of its exterior walls are windows (making for great natural light), the facade is almost entirely terra cotta, and everything is painted white.

In 1906 Thomas McCormick Sr., Irish immigrant and confectioner would pass away and his sons Thomas Jr., Frank and George would purchase the interest in their fathers fruitful confectionery business open since 1858. Thomas Jr., as vice-president of the new enterprise, would spend a great deal of time in other countries determining effective ways of making candy and other sweets. Sometime in 1912 or 1913, architects Watt and Blackwell were commissioned to design and build what at the time was considered to be “one of the finest and most sanitary factories in North America”. 100 acres of land was purchased on the east side of the city in 1913, and a 10 acre factory was constructed. By some accounts the factory at its peak, would employ some 1300 people and produce 61000kg of candy and 45000kg of biscuits daily.

McCormick’s would continue to be a major employer in London for many years, becoming an ‘anchor company’ in the city. It was not until the last 20 years of the life of the company that problems started to develop. The plant changed hands several times; in 1989, Weston Foods (of Loblaws fame) sells the plant to Culinar Foods Inc., who in turn sells it to Beta Brands in 1997. The purchase of the plant by Beta Brands puts them on the financial ropes and in 2003 fails to make payment on a 49$ million dollar debt. As a result of the missed payment, the Ontario Superior Court issues a notice of foreclosure. In 2004, the plant is sold to Sun Capital, a US-based investment firm. During the Christmas Season of 2007, workers are laid off as normal for two weeks holidays, but are told not to return until late January. There are other signs; unimpaired machinery, no purchase of new raw materials, no shipments, unreachable management staff. The end came just a few days into January of 2008, taking the last 300 jobs with it.

In recent years, several studies have been done to determine just what can be done with the site. The city has even attempted to sell the land in July of 2012 for the cost of back taxes, totaling 744000$ but found no takers.

Update 2012-08-02: It seems that a few days later, a possible buyer was found. More from CTV News here

Sources:

  • http://pbdba.lfpress.com/cgi-bin/publish.cgi?p=167370
  • http://www.london.ca/d.aspx?s=/Planning_and_Development/McCormick.htm
  • http://www.lfpress.com/news/london/2010/04/15/13595301.html
  • http://www.canoe.ca/NewsStand/LondonFreePress/Business/2003/05/15/87389.html
  • http://www.lib.uwo.ca/programs/companyinformationcanada/ccc-mccormicks.htm
  • http://www.ctvlondon.ca/tag/mccormicks/

Stackpole

Stackpole Ltd. Pump Components Division was a member of the Sterling Group of companies. Stackpole was originally founded in 1906 to construct dry batteries for Ford, later moving fully into the automotive system fabrication market in 1952. The Pump Compontents division would close its doors in 2006, likely the victim of a the massive automotive industry die-off as a part of the recession that we are just now clawing our way out of.

Stackpole

 

What is going on here?

So what am I doing here? Am I blogging, or photoblogging? Posting old stuff or just new?

All of the above, I think. Mostly photos, but there might be, upon occasion, words. This WordPress based site is far easier to update than the previous HTML based site (that was handed edited in Vim!). So I will be making posts “from the archives” as time goes on.

Hopefully an interesting experience!